BOYCOTT SOYBEANS
FROM BRAZIL

Exposing Brazil's attempt to kill the United States soybean industry by "DUMPING" and "FLOODING" the United States with cheaply produced soybeans.

Site address: http://BrazilSoybeans.BoycottBrazil.com

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WELCOME to, "BOYCOTT SOYBEANS FROM BRAZIL," the web site designed to expose Brazil's attempt to kill the United States soybean industry by "DUMPING" and "FLOODING" the United States with cheaply produced soybeans.

Why do we, as United States Citizens, allow the following facts to exist:

1. In Brazil, labor and land cost far less than in the United States., so production costs are less than half those in the United States. Land cost through the heartland of Brazil's Mato Grosso state, where vast stretches of new soybean farmland can be purchased for $150 an acre and put into production for about $350 an acre. An acre can raise two or three soybean crops a year. Farm workers in Mato Grosso are paid $90 to $200 per month and work six days a week seven durivg the harvest season.

2. Illegal CHILD LABOR [Slaves] has been documented and reported by the United States Department of State in their 1994 HUMAN RIGHTS REPORT on Brazil, within the fields of orange growers in Sao Paulo, Brazil and has extended into the fields of soybean farmers. Many children are forced to work along side their parents. Brazilian law bars all minors from work that constitutes a physical strain and dangerous conditions. Brazilian law also requires permission of the parents or guardians for working minors under age 18 to work, and they must attend school through the primary grades. The minimum working age under the Brazilian Constitution is 14 years, except for apprentices. 1994 official figures state nearly 3 million ten (10) to fourteen (14) year-old children (or 4.6 percent of the work force) were employed in Brazil.

3. CARGILL INC., the Minnesota based multinational has more than 120 plants, warehouses, port terminals and farms in Brazil. It counts more than 90 buying stations and employs more than 5,000 people. Cargill is currently assisting in financing the paving of roads from Cuiaba, a city within MATO GROSSO, Brazil to the Amazon River port SANTAREM to ship SOYBEANS. The distance is equivalent to trucking soybeans from Minneapolis to New Orleans. See, THE NEW BREADBASKET, by Kevin Diaz, Sunday March 7, 2004, METRO EDITION. Cargill opened a new export terminal in April 2003 in SANTAREM, Brazil to export soybeans. Brazil is expected to convert 50 million acres to crops by 2014. That's an area the size of Minnesota, and most will be new soybeans. STAR TRIBUNE newspaper.

4. ARCHER DANIELS MIDLAND, Illinois-based is also a major player in farming, warehousing and financing the paving of roads from Cuiaba, Brazil to the Amazon River port SANTAREM to ship SOYBEANS. See, THE NEW BREADBASKET, by Kevin Diaz, Sunday March 7, 2004, STAR TRIBUNE article.

5. BUNGE, New York-based, is a major player in farming, warehousing and financing the paving of roads from Cuiaba, Brazil to the Amazon River port SANTAREM to ship SOYBEANS. See, THE NEW BREADBASKET, by Kevin Diaz, Sunday March 7, 2004, STAR TRIBUNE article.

6. JOHN DEERE. John Deere tractors can be found all over Brazil. See, THE NEW BREADBASKET, by Kevin Diaz, Sunday March 7, 2004, STAR TRIBUNE article.

7. For an excellent overview on how CARGILL INC., ARCHER DANIELS MIDLAND, BUNGE, and JOHN DEERE are assisting Brazilians in destroying the United States Soybean FARMER, please read the article, "THE NEW BREADBASKET" by Kevin Diaz, that appeared in the Sunday March 7, 2004, STAR TRIBUNE.

DOWNLOAD MARCH 7, 2004, ARTICLE "THE NEW BREADBASKET" HERE IN PDF.

IS BRAZIL "DUMPING' SOYBEANS IN THE UNITED STATES AT LESS THAN FAIR MARKET VALUE OF SOYBEANS IN BRAZIL? YES!!!!

"DUMPING" is the sale of foreign manufactured goods in United States at less than fair market value of those goods in country of manufacture. See, TARIFF ACT OF 1930, § 731 et seq., as amended, 19 U.S.C.A. § 1673 et seq. and ZENITH ELECTRONICS vs. U.S., 988 F.2d 1573 (Fed. Cir. 1993). This case offers an excellent overview on

"DUMPING." Also see, 755 F.Supp. 397 (CIT 1990).

The Department of Commerce applies reasonable interpretation of Antidumping Act when it construes "PRINCIPLE MARKETS" as ALL MARKETS in country of export in which exporter usually sells merchandise. TARIFF ACT OF 1930, § 773(a)(1)(A), as amended, 19 U.S.C.A. § 1677b(a)(1)(A).

Boycott Brazil supporters believe steeper tariffs and a complete boycott of Brazilian soybeans is needed to assist soybean growers within the United States.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT.


For more information write (snail mail) JOHN GREGORY LAMBROS directly at:

JOHN GREGORY LAMBROS
Prisoner No. 00436-124
U.S. Penitentiary Leavenworth
P.O. Box 1000
Leavenworth, Kansas, 66048-1000
USA

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